Routes

There are lots of options for road cycling all over the peninsula and there are some mountain bike options as well.

Shizuoka guide has good suggestions for Izu and the Fuji area here

The Yamabushi Trail tour offers mountain bike trips on some ancient trails around the peninsula.  The website is in Japanese but there is a “translate” button. Outdoor Japan has a write up about the Yamabushi Trail Tour here. Focus Bike has another article here.

Great nature tours offers a number of options including bike tours and bike rentals.  It is located on the east of the peninsula (Google Map link).

The Cycle Sport Center (Google Map link) is the local of the velodrome used for the Tokyo Olympics and a mountain biking trail was also used there.  There are family-friendly options here but unfortunately the website is only in Japanese. 

Merida X base (Google Map link) has large number of bikes for rent but unfortunately the website is only in Japanese. The bike rental page is here.   They give three suggested route options on the website (click on the green, blue, and red banners here for a basic map and a QR code.  Definitely give the place a check if you are considering renting a bike for Izu.  There is a write-up about a tour starting there on the Japan travel website.

Kona stay / Kona cycle is a combination hotel, café, and bike rental / tour outfit.  The websites for Kona stay and Kona cycle are both in Japanese

Cycling Japan has Fuji / Izu trips here and here.

Samurai Sports is gearing up for the post-COVID era and is starting up in the fall of 2022.

There are some more ideas here at the Cyclist Welcome website.

Bikemap has some user-posted trips.

Another PDF link here with a long trip suggestion that includes route that travels around the Izu peninsula.

The visit Numazu website has a PDF with suggestion on bike trips in the east Shizuoka region including the Izu peninsula.

Rentals

A list of some places that offer bicycle rental of some form or another:

Repairs

There are a some of bicycle repair shops but mostly deal with commuter bikes / regular consumer bikes.  There are a lot of “hole-in-the-wall” type of places that cater to locals.   If I was planning a multi-day road cycling trip I would bring a basic repair kit and expect that if something broke there is a good chance I would need to fix it myself in the short term.

I have used “Bicycle Shop Gennoji” (Google Map Link) which specializes in mountain bikes and also the Numazu branch of Cycle Spot (Google map link) which is more of a generalist bike sales / service place. I have had great results with both although for something specific like suspension I would go to Bicycle Shop Gennoji.

There are some other places here and there on the peninsula like Nagisa cycle  (Google Map link) but you should definitely check your route out beforehand. 

Purchasing bicycles

As far as buying a bike in Japan it is certainly possible but there are a few qualifications.  First of all, prices can be a bit higher than elsewhere and the range of bikes available may not suit your needs.  Large frame bikes are very, very difficult to find.  Finally, bikes purchased locally are legally required to be registered.  The process for residents of Japan is fairly easy but it may be a bit difficult for someone on a tourist visa.  There are of course many serious cyclists who bring their own bikes to Japan for a cycling holiday without any incident. 

Road bicycles are more popular than hardtail or full-suspension mountain bikes and the selection reflects that.  There are some routes around Izu that are a good match for hardtail or full-suspension bikes but the vast majority of cyclists in Izu are on the road.

Purchasing bicycles

As far as buying a bike in Japan it is certainly possible but there are a few qualifications.  First of all, prices can be a bit higher than elsewhere and the range of bikes available may not suit your needs.  Large frame bikes are very, very difficult to find.  Finally, bikes purchased locally are legally required to be registered.  The process for residents of Japan is fairly easy but it may be a bit difficult for someone on a tourist visa.  There are of course many serious cyclists who bring their own bikes to Japan for a cycling holiday without any incident. 

Road bicycles are more popular than hardtail or full-suspension mountain bikes and the selection reflects that.  There are some routes around Izu that are a good match for hardtail or full-suspension bikes but the vast majority of cyclists in Izu are on the road.